Yorkshire Hogs, Also known as the Large White

 

Rolling in the Mud

Pigs Don't have Sweat Glands

Rolling in the mud

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These Hogs distinguished by their hefty bearing, erect ears, slightly dished faces, white color, pink skins, and long deep sides. Their valued for their bacon production since the inception of the breed. As their name suggests, their characterized by their large size.Large White

 

The Large White regarded as a rugged and hardy breed that can withstand variations in climate and other environmental factors. Their ability to cross with and improve other breeds has truly made them a factor nearly everywhere commercial swine produced.  Known for decades as a favorite market animal where high quality bacon and pork are sought. They have a tendency to grow and not lay down excess fat have made them favorites, not only when swine marketed at relatively light weights, but also when their carried to heavier weights.

Large Whites known for large litters, heavy milk production and for having excellent maternal instincts. They are not only lean and active, but are also quite sound in feet and legs. They carry their considerable length with ease and grace. Their extra height, or length of leg, helps them to remain active and have long useful lives in the breeding pen.

Yorkshire

Large White

Yorkshire Hog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Small Yorkshire

Small Yorkshire was a breed of domestic pig originating in the United Kingdom. This was common during the nineteenth century. It is now extinct, but its characteristics used in producing the Middle White and other breeds. Cross-breeding the traditional Old Yorkshire, a large white pig, with imported Chinese pigs

Small Yorkshire was a breed of domestic pig originating in the United Kingdom. This was common during the nineteenth century. It is now extinct, but its characteristics used in producing the Middle White and other breeds. Cross-breeding the traditional Old Yorkshire, a large white pig, with imported Chinese pigs

More for show than bacon or porker. This was to lead to the creation of a new type after an incident at the 1852 Keighley Agricultural Show. When pigs belonging to Joseph Tuley, a weaver, refused entry to the Large White class. Their considered too small; their bred by crossing Large White sows with Small boars. Tuley’s pigs were, however, considered good enough that a new breed created. The Middle White, which went on to be one of the most popular breeds of pig during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century It retains the distinctive pricked ears and short snout.