Goats

We have added Goats to The Circle C Hogs Ranch

 

Land Requirements. Goats can be reared intensively on small acreage by using supplemental feed. If using an extensive system, 2 to 10 goats per acre is a rough guide depending on the supply of grass and brush. Goats are top down grazers and will select from weeds, leaves and grasses to meet their own requirements.

Ruby

Bengi

Juliette

Here are popular goat breeds used for meat production.
Boer. …
Rangeland. …
Kalahari. …
Kiko. …
Nubian. …
Myotonic. …
Black Bengal. 25 million Black Bengal goats can be found in Bangladesh. …
Verata. The Verata goat is known primarily for its unique, twisted horns.                                                                                                                                                                     Goats are ideal for those new to keeping livestock as they are small (therefore requiring less land per head than cattle), fairly easy to handle and multi-purpose; potentially providing milk, meat and land management.
Goats are ruminants, which means they chew their cud like cattle and have a 4-compartmented stomach that uses bacteria to break down grasses, scrub and other green material.
At the census of 2002 carried out by the US Department of Agriculture goats raised for meat had increased by 58% over a 5 year period. Given the buoyant market for goat meat from Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Hispanic, West Indian and West African communities this looks set to continue. Alternatively for the hobby farmer, raising meat goats for showing is an ideal way to enjoy goats.

Goats are ideal for those new to keeping livestock as they are small (therefore requiring less land per head than cattle), fairly easy to handle and multi-purpose; potentially providing milk, meat and land management.
Goats are ruminants, which means they chew their cud like cattle and have a 4-compartmented stomach that uses bacteria to break down grasses, scrub and other green material.
At the census of 2002 carried out by the US Department of Agriculture goats raised for meat had increased by 58% over a 5 year period. Given the buoyant market for goat meat from Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Hispanic, West Indian and West African communities this looks set to continue. Alternatively for the hobby farmer, raising meat goats for showing is an ideal way to enjoy goats.

Land Requirements

Goats can be reared intensively on small acreage by using supplemental feed. If using an extensive system, 2 to 10 goats per acre is a rough guide depending on the supply of grass and brush. Goats are top down grazers and will select from weeds, leaves and grasses to meet their own requirements. They can also help to improve marginal areas encouraging re-establishment of grassy species so providing low cost environmental management as well as meat.

Choosing your stock

Choosing healthy stock is important but difficult for the beginner. The best advice is to buy from a reputable goat producer in your area. That way the animals will already be acclimated. Expect to pay a premium for pure-bred show animals. The most common meat breeds are below.

Here are some Signs when a Nanny Goat goes in Heat

Here are some ways to recognize goat heat:

The doe gets talkative. Most goats don’t make much noise, but a doe in heat may vocalize more than usual when she goes in heat.
The doe wags her tail. …
The doe’s personality changes. …
Her tail gets sticky. …
Milk volume changes. …
Your does act bucky. …
The doe urinates often. …
The buck acts goofy.

The Doe will sometimes have a swelling in her Vulva.

Some Does will have a Discharge in her Vulva.

 

 

Knowing how to Handle your Pig

By the time they are weaned young pigs are too big to be easily lifted. Older pigs can be moved from place to place using pig boards.
Pigs are very clever and quick to learn. They can be dangerous.

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Handling the young pig

Catch by the Hind Leg

Piglets can be caught from behind and held by grasping the hind leg just above the hock. The small piglet can then be lifted by placing the other hand under the chest and lifting the animal. When holding the piglet always support its weight against you. By the time the piglet is weaned it will be too heavy to lift.
Handling the young pig

Handling the older pig

Pigs will naturally head for a gap (or opening) when you approach them or try to catch them. You can use this habit to make the pig go where you want it to If two pig boards (wooden boards 0.8m square) are placed either side of the pig’s head it will move forward in the direction the handlers want it to go. As the animal gets older it can be trained to move under the control of one handler who uses a board and a wooden bat about 1 m long.
The handler always keeps the pig board between himself and the pig. If several people try to drive a pig it can turn and charge between them.
Restraining a pig
You can restrain a pig by holding it with ropes against a wall or fence. Large pigs can be easily restrained with a rope or wire loop around the snout.
Restraining a pig

Teeth clipping in young pigs

The teeth of the young pig are clipped as soon as possible after birth. The piglet is born with 8 teeth.
If the teeth are not clipped the sow’s (mother) udder may be injured by the suckling piglets. Removal of the teeth also prevents the young pigs injuring themselves while fighting or playing.

1 Understand why the teeth of young pigs are clipped.
2 Carry out teeth clipping on the piglet as soon as possible after its birth.
3 Handle the sow and her young with as little stress as possible to both.
Why are the teeth of piglets clipped?

Piglets bite the sow (mother) in their fight to get hold of one of her teats and suckle. The pain caused by this disturbs the sow causing her to get up and prevents her young from feeding. The cuts to the sow’s udder also allow germs to infect the udder. In their fight to grasp the teat and suckle piglets will also bite and injure one another. The simple practice of clipping the teeth as soon as possible after birth prevents these problems.
When to clip the teeth
The piglet’s teeth should be cut as soon as possible after its birth. The teeth can be cut when the pig is only 15 minutes old. The sow and her young should be separated for as short a time as possible. In order to clip the teeth you will need either a pair of tooth clippers, or pliers or forceps.
You will need someone to help you separate the sow and her young. You will also need a box containing bedding and a clean empty pen.

At The Circle C Ranch We have Friendly Animals

 

These two hang out together

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Here at the Ranch we have Friendly animals, our Calf hangs around the Hog we call Candy, They are always together, if we put Candy in the barn for a few days the calf, (Hamburger/Steak) stands outside the barn Mooing all day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pork Chop, the Hog that thinks he is a Dog

 

This Hog thinks he is a Dog, he comes up to you and wants you to pet him, talk to him and Rub his sides and belly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Pigs are bred mostly for their meat, but pigs can also make excellent pets. In fact, some types of pigs are regularly kept as indoor pets because of their intelligence and personality. Whether you are raising a pig as a pet or for consumption purposes, it is important to feed the pig a balanced diet appropriate to the age and weight of the pig. As a pig grows, it needs different types of food to help it develop into a healthy animal.

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      1. Starter Feed

     

      1. When a pig is weaned off its mother’s milk, it will be fed a starter feed. Starter feeds are made from dried milk products like lactose and whey and animal protein products such as fish meal and dried plasma. Starter diets are typically broken up into three phases depending on the weight of the pig. The pig is fed the Starter 1 diet until it reaches 15 lbs. The Starter 2 diet is fed until the pig reaches 25 lbs., and then the pig is fed the Starter 3 diet until it reaches 50 lbs.Grower-to-Finisher Feed

     

      1. After the pig has reached approximately 50 lbs., it should be fed a grower-to-finisher feed. These types of feed are given to the pigs in phases — there are four phases in total. The first phase is fed until the pig reaches 100 lbs., the second phase is fed until the pig reaches 150 lbs., and the third phase is fed until the pig weighs 150 lbs. The finisher stage is fed until the pig reaches its final weight, which is about 270 lbs. for most pigs.Grower-to-Finisher Feed

     

      1. After the pig has reached approximately 50 lbs., it should be fed a grower-to-finisher feed. These types of feed are given to the pigs in phases — there are four phases in total. The first phase is fed until the pig reaches 100 lbs., the second phase is fed until the pig reaches 150 lbs., and the third phase is fed until the pig weighs 150 lbs. The finisher stage is fed until the pig reaches its final weight, which is about 270 lbs. for most pigs.Gestation Feed

     

      1. This diet is fed to gestating sows and differs from the regular pig diet in that it has higher amounts of vitamins and minerals. When a pig is eating a gestation feed, it will receive about 3.5 to 5 lbs. of feed in a day, which is less than it would normally get; this is because the food is so rich in nutrients and vitamins. This diet is also fed to boars who are the correct age for breeding.Lactation Feed

     

      When a sow gives birth to her young, she should be fed a special lactation feed. Lactation feed, like gestation feed, has a higher level of minerals and nutrients to support her production of milk. However, gestation feed should never replace lactation feed, because it does not contain adequate nutrients for the pig. This diet is fed to the pig gradually until by the seventh or eighth day of lactation the sow is consuming a full amount

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The Circle C Ranch

    Piglets to Pork—Slowly Grown

    Here at Circle C Ranch, we are very particular about our breeding Hogs, the way we raise our hogs, Our stock is a mixture of  Heritage breeds including Berkshire, Red Wattle, and Yorkshire.  Because we only breed twice a year, we are able to farrow all year round, and we are able to slowly raise our hogs in order to create a better tasting product.  We normally wean our piglets between the ages of 6-8 weeks in the summer or 8-10 weeks in the winter; it’s not healthy for a piglet to be weaned at an earlier age due to the immaturity of its digestive system.

    Weaning Piglets

    Large Black Hog

    It’s not hard to wean them at this age as the sow has already thoroughly taught them the fine arts of rummaging and foraging for nuts, roots, grubs, grasses, and other piggy delights! As soon as they are separated from their mothers, we supplement their diet by adding soy, corn mix, and goat whey. Everything in their diet is natural, no additives. Even the goat whey comes from a farm where the animals are raised naturally with an all-natural diet and are Animal Welfare Approved. This additional nourishment also improves the taste of the meat by adding to the fat content, which contains much of the flavor

    We continue with this diet until the pigs reach a weight of about 250 pounds, which is at about 8-10 months of age. Throughout this time, they receive no unnecessary antibiotics. When hogs are truly raised naturally and humanely like ours are, they are less likely to become ill, so antibiotics are rarely needed. If there is a case of a pig becoming ill, it is separated from the herd for 30 days, and it is not butchered for a time period that is at least twice the licensed withdrawal period of the antibiotic used (a standard set by the Animal Welfare Approved program). In other words, if an antibiotic is technically supposed to be out of a hog’s system in 30 days, for example, we will not butcher the animal for a period of 60 days. This gives more than enough time for the antibiotic to work its way completely out of the pig’s system, so you do not receive unwanted antibiotics from our products.
    To give you an idea of how slowly we wean and raise our hogs, I’ll show you the difference between our methods and those used by a CAFO (slowly grown compared to a fast product):

    Feeder pigs traditionally come from a Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO), a large facility that holds about 7,000 hogs. The pigs are kept, about 20 to an enclosure, in small pens that allow little room for the pigs to move. They are raised on concrete slabs covered with wooden slates. Hog manure and urine fall through and sit under the wooden slates on the concrete until they are flushed out.
    When CAFO piglets are about 3 weeks in age and weigh 75lbs, some of the pigs are sold off as “feeder hogs” to other farmers. At this age, the producer has to give the piglets “creep feed,” a milk supplement. The piglets need this feed for nourishment until they are 8 weeks old because their immature digestive systems cannot handle anything else. Since these piglets have not been taught to forage for their food, they do not get the added nutrition their natural instinct should provide, and they rely solely on the farmer for food. Their diet will depend on the farmer’s personal preferences, which may include animal-by-product based feed.
    The other half of the piglets stay at the CAFO facility until they reach processing weight, which varies according to how large a farmer would like his pork cuts to be. CAFOs typically feed their stock corn and soy, but they also regularly supplement the feed with antibiotics and growth hormones to raise larger, “healthier” animals.   Because the hogs are continually fed low-dose antibiotics, there is no way to ensure that their meat is antibiotic free.  There is concern that meat from CAFO raised hogs may actually cause antibiotics to be less effective for human beings. Due to this concern, various groups—including the USDA, The American Medical Association, and The World Health Organization—are working to limit or ban the use of low-level antibiotics in CAFO feed (The National Association of Local Boards of Health).

    Large black Piglet       /This Article was Copied from the Circle B Ranch

    To put everything in plain terms, a slowly grown Circle C Ranch hog is entirely different than one produced by a CAFO.  The difference is as huge as the divide between a thoroughly planned home-cooked meal and a three-minute pit stop at the drive-thru.  While the faster meal may be quicker and easier, we all know that fast-food is inherently bad for us

    Good to Eat

     

     

    Pork chops used to be on the doctors’ hit list. Today, however, pork is “the other white meat” and is a healthy alternative to red meat. And when it’s eaten in reasonable quantities (8 oz), a pork chop can be quite good for you. Pork chops can be relatively lean, but they’re typically not as low-fat as Chicken or Fish.

    Favorite Recipes

    Pork Chops

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    Pans to cook the pork in.

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    Recipes to put in the pans.

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    Yorkshire Hogs, Also known as the Large White

     

    Rolling in the Mud

    Pigs Don't have Sweat Glands

    Rolling in the mud

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    These Hogs distinguished by their hefty bearing, erect ears, slightly dished faces, white color, pink skins, and long deep sides. Their valued for their bacon production since the inception of the breed. As their name suggests, their characterized by their large size.Large White

     

    The Large White regarded as a rugged and hardy breed that can withstand variations in climate and other environmental factors. Their ability to cross with and improve other breeds has truly made them a factor nearly everywhere commercial swine produced.  Known for decades as a favorite market animal where high quality bacon and pork are sought. They have a tendency to grow and not lay down excess fat have made them favorites, not only when swine marketed at relatively light weights, but also when their carried to heavier weights.

    Large Whites known for large litters, heavy milk production and for having excellent maternal instincts. They are not only lean and active, but are also quite sound in feet and legs. They carry their considerable length with ease and grace. Their extra height, or length of leg, helps them to remain active and have long useful lives in the breeding pen.

    Yorkshire

    Large White

    Yorkshire Hog

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Small Yorkshire

    Small Yorkshire was a breed of domestic pig originating in the United Kingdom. This was common during the nineteenth century. It is now extinct, but its characteristics used in producing the Middle White and other breeds. Cross-breeding the traditional Old Yorkshire, a large white pig, with imported Chinese pigs

    Small Yorkshire was a breed of domestic pig originating in the United Kingdom. This was common during the nineteenth century. It is now extinct, but its characteristics used in producing the Middle White and other breeds. Cross-breeding the traditional Old Yorkshire, a large white pig, with imported Chinese pigs

    More for show than bacon or porker. This was to lead to the creation of a new type after an incident at the 1852 Keighley Agricultural Show. When pigs belonging to Joseph Tuley, a weaver, refused entry to the Large White class. Their considered too small; their bred by crossing Large White sows with Small boars. Tuley’s pigs were, however, considered good enough that a new breed created. The Middle White, which went on to be one of the most popular breeds of pig during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century It retains the distinctive pricked ears and short snout.

    Keys To Success In Raising Livestock Farming

    Livestock farming is an industry that is different from any other industry. The better you know about it the more are your chances of being a successful livestock farmer.

    Raising livestock is a great way of making lots of money in a field that not so money people are in. But before you get started in livestock farming you have to get as much knowledge as you can about this industry and what is required to raise healthy profitable livestock.

    Two profitable livestock that you may raise when starting out in livestock farming are cattle and sheep. These livestock are very profitable because their milk and meat is high in demand and the market is large enough for anyone to have a piece of the pie.

    Cattle:

    Raising cattle will always be a good business venture which has great return of investment. One way you can look at it is you “buy cheap cattle, fatten them up and sell them at a higher price”.

    When getting started the first thing you have to do is buy your cattle. Places where you can buy your cattle are at livestock auctions, advertisements in your local newspaper and you can even ask other livestock farmers on who sells good healthy cattle. You can buy a few weaned calves or some feeders just to start with.

    Once you have bought your cattle its time to take care of them. The first thing to do is to build your cattle some shelter. When starting out you can build a simple windbreaker and once you start making money you can then build a bigger shelter.

    Feeding your cattle well is the most important of all. Good pasture is a great way of feeding your cattle. To also help in feeding your livestock you can give them alfalfa and corn. Don’t forget to give your cattle plenty of water as well. A single cow can drink about 12 gallons of water per day.

    Sheep:

    Just like cattle, sheep are rewarding livestock to raise. You can raise sheep for milk, meat and wool. But in order to get some good returns in investment from your sheep you have to be dedicated to your venture and take care of your sheep.

    Sheep also need some shelter to be protected from harsh temperatures. A sheep house is where your sheep well also sleep, feed and give birth.

    When starting out in feeding sheep you have to be aware that different kinds of sheep need different kinds of food. Ewes, lambs, and rams are all feed in a different way so when buying your feed make sure you are buying the right feed for the type of sheep you are raising.

    Raising healthy sheep requires you to feed them well. In order for your sheep to get enough nutrients you have to feed them forage which contains proteins and energy, not forgetting pasture as well. Also give your sheep enough water because its crucial for their health. And make sure that the feeders are clean to discourage the spread of fatal diseases.

    Complete Beginners Guide to Raising Your Own Healthy Livestock

    Livestock farming is a rewarding venture when you are a well established livestock farmer. And the nice thing is that anyone can be a successful farmer with the right guidelines and information.

    When starting in livestock farming you have to know what you want to achieve from your farm. You also need to determine the type of livestock you want to raise which can be determined by the land you have and how much money you willing to invest.

    Two types of livestock you can begin with are cattle and pigs. Their products are high in demand and can be a reliable source of food for your family.

    Cattle:

    Cattle farming is the most progressive in the industry of livestock farming because of its big returns in investment. In order to be successful in cattle farming you have start with a good foundation and learn how to proper care for your cattle.

    First know what you want to achieve from your cattle farm. Do you want to raise cattle for milk or raise cattle for meat. You also have to prepare some money to invest in your project.

    What ever your reason maybe for raising cattle you have to make sure your cattle are proper feed. Cattle strive well when grass fed so it’s vital that you have enough supply of grass or have large pasture. Supplement your cattle’s diet with plant proteins and have a vet check on them every once in a while. Also make sure you have enough water for your cattle to drink.

    Pigs:

    Raising pigs is much easier than raising cattle, they are intelligent and can be trained. But how ever they need extra care than other types of livestock.

    When starting out its important that you choose the right breed. You should choose a healthy pig from a well known pig breeder. Make sure you buy more than two pigs so they give each other company. Once you have bought your pigs it’s important to take care of them. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to provide them with some mud and dirt to play around every once in a while.

    Pigs need to be proper feed with nutritious food. They can be feed with varieties of grain such as barley and wheat. You can also feed them with left over foods which will save you lots of money. Don’t forget to give your pigs plenty of water and clean their house every once in a while.

    Farming Pigs – Importance of Proper Food and Diet When Raising Pigs

    The diet of your pig is very important for when farming pigs. Although food scraps and leftovers can be fed to your pigs, you should consider proper nutrition for your pigs to ensure they grow up healthy. Pigs have tremendous appetite and will eat anything edible you throw at them, but it doesn’t mean you should settle for that. Remember that keeping your pigs healthy is your top priority when farming pigs.

    Groceries and specialty stores for farming pigs sell feeds made specifically for pigs. It has all the vitamins and minerals they need to be healthy. There are commercial pig feeds and supplements that are made especially for piglet while some are best used for adults. It can be purchased easily and is affordable but you can also make a pig feed on your own, you just have to know what vitamins and minerals are important to your pigs diet and where you can get them.

    o Water – Perhaps the most important thing in your pig’s diet. Pigs need plenty of water and can consume about 20% of their own body weight. Since pigs don’t have sweat glands like humans do, they need plenty of water to regulate body heat. Water also helps in their digestion and absorption of other nutrients.

    o Carbohydrates – This is the fuel that provides energy for your pigs. Grass and hay are a good source of carbohydrates for your pigs. Sugars, such as lactose and fructose, are also necessary to keep your pigs healthy. You can get them from oats, corn and other cereal grains.

    o Lipids – Also known as fats. Lipids are more efficient in providing energy than carbohydrates. Since it is a better energy source, it can help reduce food consumption when farming pigs. However, this doesn’t mean you should stop feeding carbohydrates and focus on an all-lipids diet. Feeding too much lipids to save money on farming pigs is a bad idea because it can give your pigs diarrhea. Sources of lipids are canola, corn oil and soybean oil.

    o Protein – Protein is necessary for the health of your pig’s blood cells, muscles and tissues. When giving your pigs protein, you should always consider quality over quantity when farming pigs; it is better to give your pigs few high quality proteins and many low quality proteins. Soybean meal is a good protein source because it has a high quality amino acid.

    o Vitamin K – Is important for blood clotting and can be found in fishmeal.

    o Vitamin A – Is necessary for good bone structure. It can be found in grasses and legumes such as alfalfa.